Book Promotion: Do This, Not That – September 2018

by | Sep 27, 2018

By Amy Collins

Does any of this sound familiar?

  • “I wrote this book so that I could make a living as a writer.”
  • “My goal is to quit my day job.”
  • “I plan on retiring on my book income.”

If any of those sentiments have crossed your mind or your lips, this month’s DO THIS NOT THAT is for you. (You are not going to like it… but keep reading.)

What She Did

I recently met with a Chicago-area author for breakfast who was concerned that she was doing something wrong. This author had written a terrific book, designed the cover properly, promoted the book heavily, placed ads on Amazon, got reviews and consistently worked to sell her book to stores, libraries, online and to organizations.

So what was the problem?

The book was not selling ENOUGH. All of those activities–and her book was still limping along in sales.

When, she asked, and HOW were her sales going to allow her to make a living?

What She Should Have Done Instead

Well, I had to tell her that her book sales would NEVER allow her to make a living. If history and reality were any indication, one non-fiction book (no matter how well written and powerful) is not enough to support an author.

So what is the answer? Why do some authors get to make a living as writers and what separates them from the rest of the authors who do not?

They diversify and create numerous avenues of writing income.

This author was leaning WAY too heavily on her one book when her income could have been augmented and her fame and sales as an author could have increased if she had also:

  • Created a workshop based on her book
  • Pitched her advice and writing to a magazine as a freelance article for pay
  • Developed a podcast and promoted it to subscribers
  • Created and sold journals and auxiliary materials connected with the book
  • Written another book

See? Writing and promoting your book is just a piece of the puzzle. To truly succeed as a writer and as an author, you need more than one piece to successfully get that puzzle together. Fiction and nonfiction authors who make a living as writers do not do so on one book.

What She is Doing Now

The truth is, THIS author is not interested in writing a second book. At the moment, it is not in her plans, but she is still working towards her dream of quitting her day job.

This author is turning everything around and creating a marketing and business plan that promotes her MESSAGE and herself as an expert. Speeches, workshops, consulting sessions…. Already she is making a great deal more BASED on her book.

And guess what? Her book sales have gone through the roof.

Think This Not That

Cathy Davis, from Davis Creative and I got to talking about my author and she had a very similar story with one of her authors. A lawyer-turned-author had written a terrific children’s book and was devastated at the end of a year that his sales had not even crested 400 units. Like my author, the lawyer had taken all the steps we suggested and the sales did not manifest. His question to Cathy was “Why did my book not become a big seller?”

Industry experts like Cathy and I face this question every day from authors and I can offer an answer that will encourage and depress you. (Again… sorry!)

Talented authors all over the world are writing terrific books and promoting them properly and they are not selling. It is not the fault of the author or a problem with the book. It is just how reality works.

I have heard a lot of talented singers in my day at local festivals. I have watched some terribly talented golfers consistently play fantastic games of golf. I have dozens of friends who paint beautiful pictures. None of THEM expect to make a living with THEIR talent.

Those talented folks would be THRILLED to quit their day jobs and make a living with their talent, but very few of them are surprised when it does not happen. They are not shocked. Why are authors so consistently shocked when their first book does not generate an independent income?

So let’s focus on using our talent and writing to make that full-time living we are all dreaming of.

  • WRITE that NEXT book.
  • BOOK that speech.
  • CREATE that podcast.
  • GENERATE that advertising income.
  • SELL that story line.
  • PITCH that freelance writing job…

Let’s keep going!
 
Photo: BigStockPhoto

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4 Comments

  1. Kerry Gans

    Hi. You said: “They divest themselves and create numerous avenues of writing income.”

    Did you mean “diversify”? Because divest means to walk away from something, and I think that’s not what you meant.

    Love the advice! I’m going to include this column in our weekly link roundup on Thursday.

    Reply
  2. Lucinda E Clarke

    I earned my living from writing – radio and TV scripts, mayoral speeches, brochures, adverts, magazine articles, short stories – you name it I wrote it. I can’t even remember all the different topics now -but I was writing, that was all that mattered. Now I am retired and trying books – I couldn’t live on the income – or lack of it – but I am still writing and that’s all that matters. :)

    Reply
  3. Joan Stewart

    Amy, I don’t understand your advice at the end to “WRITE that NEXT book.” I see so many authors (you probably do too) writing that first book, publicizing it for a month or two after launch, getting discouraged by few book sales, then writing off the first book and diving into writing the second one. They should be spending at least the next six months doing the other things you suggested: promoting their expertise, getting onto the speaking circuit, etc. How does writing a second book help?

    Reply
    • Amy Collins

      What I meant was that authors should always be promoting AND always be writing. The key to success is not any one thing, but the key to failure often comes down to one thing. If you are not writing AND promoting, you are going to miss some important deadlines and success goals.

      If an author is not working on their next book, they will be “behind” on providing their readers with the next segment of the story (fiction)or the next important bits of advice (non-fiction) that their readers want.

      For those who say that they don’t have time to do both, I am FINE with that answer, but then they will not have the same level of success that authors who do. It does not mean that they will not be successful, it just means that they will not do AS well.

      When an author tells me that they want to quit their day job, I ask them if they are willing to CHANGE their day job…. successful authorship is more than a full-time job.

      Reply

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