The Ebook Retail Universe

by | Dec 23, 2015

I realized after my last post (looking at ebook conversion tools) that in my excitement in finally getting to the nuts and bolts of ebook creation that I’d skipped over online conversion tools. Most of those tools either are directly attached to ebook retailer websites or are attached indirectly through distributors/aggregators. So I’m going to have to backtrack.

This month I’ll talk about the retailers and distributors that you are going to be interested in, and next month I’m going to talk about the conversion tools that they offer.

Cut Out the Middle Man: Top Ebook Retailers

What retailers and distributors do you want to consider selling your ebooks through?

Okay. I’m assuming that you’re in the US — which isn’t a given, I know. (Most of this information is true for non-US publishers as well.)

That being the case, these are the major retailers you will probably be looking at:

    1. Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP)
    2. Apple’s iTunes Connect (iBooks Store)
    3. Barnes & Noble’s Nook Press
    4. Google Play
    5. Rakuten’s Writing Life (Kobo)

These are the five largest ebook retailers in the US; most of them sell throughout the world, either directly from their own websites (Amazon, Apple, Google), or both directly as well as indirectly through affiliates (Rakuten). At this point, Barnes and Noble only sells in the US.

These are the other sites with which I usually have clients sign up for accounts. Here is a basic rundown of each:

Amazon

KDP logo

Publishing site: https://kdp.amazon.com
File formats accepted: ePub, HTML, mobi, Word doc/docx
Royalty:

    1. 70% of sales price[1] if between $2.99 and $9.99. $0.15/megabyte “transport fee” deducted from each download. Available on some international sites other than Amazon.com only for KindleSelect/KindleUnlimited titles.[2]
    1. 35% for any ebook between $0.99 and $1.99. No transport fee

Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Conversion fee: None

Amazon is the center of the self-publishing universe right now, so the Kindle Direct Publishing program is a must for ebook publishing. Depending on whom you ask, a typical publisher gets between 60% and 85% of its ebook revenue through sales on the Kindle Store.

Apple

Apple logo

Publishing site: https://itunesconnect.apple.com
File formats accepted: ePub, iBooks Author
Royalty: 70% of retail price. No transport fee
Term: Payable monthly, forty-five days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Conversion fee: None

According to most analysts, Apple is the second most important retail source. Sales typically make up 5% to 15% of an ebook publisher’s revenue. The downside: You can only upload to Apple’s iTunes Connect using one of two Mac-only pieces of software: iTunes Producer or iBooks Author. So if you’re not in the Apple ecosystem already, you probably want to use a distributor like Smashwords to get your ebooks up there.

Barnes and Noble

Nook logo

Publishing site: https://nookpress.com
File formats accepted: ePub, Word doc/docx, HTML, RTF (rich text file), TXT (plain text)
Royalty: 65% of retail price between $0.99 and $9.99; 40% over $9.99. No transport fee
Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Conversion fee: None

Barnes and Noble sales typically make up 5% to 10% of an ebook publisher’s revenue. They are struggling mightily to stay afloat as 2015 winds down.

Google

Google play logo

Publishing site: https://play.google.com/books/publish
File formats accepted: ePub, PDF (which can be created from Word docs on both Mac and PC by using the Print command)
Royalty: 52% of retail price (though they will always discount the retail price—if calculated from the discounted price, I believe they pay out ~60%). No transport fee
Term: Payable monthly, forty-five days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Conversion fee: None

Of the five retailers listed, most publishers would list Google Play as #5, providing between 2% and 10% of total revenue. However, don’t ever count Google out. Also, the bookstore’s reach is truly global, and your books will show up on Google Books, linked to any print edition.[3]

Kobo

Kobo logo

Publishing site: https://writinglife.kobobooks.com
File formats accepted: ePub, PDF (which can be created from Word docs on both Mac and PC by using the Print command)
Royalty: 70% of retail price. No transport fee
Term: Payable monthly, forty-five days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Conversion fee: None

Although Kobo’s presence in the US market is small, it’s a global giant, selling both directly (through its own ebook stores in many countries) and distributed through affiliates like the UK’s Waterstones, France’s FNAC, Japan’s Rakuten, and many others.

I’ll Get It for You Wholesale: Ebook Distributors and Aggregators

Although there are many other companies (ScribD, Overdrive, Gardners, etc.) that you probably want to make your ebook available through, most of them are either difficult or impossible to create vendor accounts with, and so it is important to use a distributor/aggregator to get your ebooks up on these other sites.

Most of these sites will provide you with a free ISBN for your ebook. This may or may not be a good thing. That will make the distributor the publisher of record (as in, their name will show up in the publisher slot on most retail sites); also, you’re not supposed to use the ISBN except on sites to which the aggregator distributes.

These companies will also (usually) distribute to some or all of the Big Five retailers listed above. Here are some of the distributors you want to look at (you’ll probably only work with one or at most two):

There are others; these are the ones with which I have had direct experience, and which are most widely used. If you’ve had experience with other distributors, please share your experience in the comments!

These companies make their money in some combination of three ways:

    1. Cut: Frequently, they take a percentage of gross revenue (that is, they calculate the percentage based on the total sale amount and take a set percentage of that amount.)
    1. Conversion/setup fee: Sometimes they charge a fee to convert your file or to “set up” the title for distribution.
    1. Membership: occasionally, they charge an annual listing or membership fee.

Here’s a rundown:

Aer.io

Aer logo

Publishing site: https://aer.io
File formats accepted: ePub, PDF (which can be created from Word docs on both Mac and PC by using the Print command)
Cut: 10%
Term: Payable monthly, forty-five days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Google, Kobo, “more”
Conversion/membership fee: No conversion fee. $49/year membership fee for retail distribution; $99/year membership fee with social networking

Aer.io is primarily a tool for setting up an online ecommerce solution without the headache of setting up a store on your website. However, they also offer distribution services, and they are one of the few services that offers PDF conversion.

BookBaby

Bookbaby logo

Publishing site: https://bookbaby.com
File formats accepted: ePub, Word doc/docx, PDF, “other popular digital document” formats
Cut: 0%
Term: Payable monthly, forty-five days after the end of the month in which Bookbaby receives payment.
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Baker & Tayor (Blio), Oyster, Flipkart, Copia, Gardners, eSentral, Scribd, Ciando, EBSCO, Vearsa
Conversion/membership fee: $299 conversion fee. No membership.

BookBaby is an almost-full-service publishing services provider — they’ll take your manuscript and, for a fee, produce it as a print book (with a professionally designed cover) and/or as an ebook. (They don’t provide editorial services in-house, however.)

What’s the difference between this kind of setup and the so-called vanity presses that prey on the unknowing? A legitimate publishing services provider offers a service for a price; they don’t purport to act as a publisher, which would imply they’ll make money by selling your books. Vanity presses will charge for services (usually top dollar) and then take a major cut of all sales revenue as well. A publisher is a publisher; a service provider is a service provider. If a company offers to do both, watch out.

BookBaby will charge $299 (if you’re going the ebook-only route),[4] but won’t take a percentage of the royalty.

Draft2Digital (D2D)

Draft 2 Digital logo

Publishing site: https://draft2digital.com
File formats accepted: ePub, Word doc/docx, RTF — “anything Word can read”
Cut: 10%
Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Distribution: Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Inktera (Page Foundry), Scribd, Tolino, CreateSpace (Amazon print on demand)
Conversion/membership fee: $0

I haven’t worked with Draft2Digital (I mostly use Smashwords as a distributor — see below — and have used and recommend all of the other providers on this list), but I have had friends and clients who have loved them and the service they provide. They won’t distribute directly to Amazon or Google Play.

IngramSpark!

IngramSpark logo

Publishing site: https://ingramspark.com
File formats accepted: PDF, ePub
Cut: 20-30% (depending on the retailer)
Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Baker & Tayor (Blio), Oyster, Scribd, and over sixty other retailers (but NOT Google Play)
Conversion/membership fee: $25 setup fee; $0.60/page (for PDF to ePub)

Bet you didn’t see this one coming.

IngramSpark! is one of the largest print-on-demand providers in the world — the main competitor to Amazon’s CreateSpace. But in addition to printing and distributing hardcover and paperback books, they provide ePub distribution as well.

Upside: They have (almost certainly) the largest distribution list of any aggregator. (Ingram is a pre-eminent print distributor/wholesaler, and so has direct relationships with just about every book retailer on the planet.)

Downside: They take by far the largest cut of any aggregator; they also charge to set each title up, and to convert from PDF (but not if you’ve got an ePub file ready).

Lulu

Lulu logo

Publishing site: https://lulu.com
File formats accepted: PDF, ePub
Cut: 10% of NET REVENUE (the money received by Lulu, not the sales amount; this works out to under 10% of gross revenue)
Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo
Conversion/membership fee: $25 setup fee; $0.60/page (for PDF to ePub)

I haven’t used Lulu for a long time, when I helped a client set up an account; like IngramSpark! they are mostly known as a print-on-demand provider. They only distribute ebooks to the major retailers — and not Google Play.

Pronoun

Pronoun logo

Publishing site: https://pronoun.com
File formats accepted: PDF, ePub
Cut: 10% of NET REVENUE (the money received by Lulu, not the sales amount; this works out to under 10% of gross revenue)
Term: Payable monthly, sixty days after the end of the month in which the sale occurred.
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Google Play
Conversion/membership fee: $0

NOTE: Still in Beta as of December, 2015. When last I used this service, it was called Vook, and I liked it, but didn’t really need it (it was a soup-to-nuts online conversion-and-distribution service provider, similar to BookBaby). Since then, the company has reinvented itself as Pronoun, a no-charge distributor/aggregator (similar to Smashwords or Draft2Digital).

Smashwords

Smashwords logo

Publishing site: https://smashwords.com
File formats accepted: ePub, Word doc (not docx)
Cut: 10%
Term: Payable quarterly, fifteen to thirty days after the end of the quarter in which the sale occurred.
Distribution: Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Baker & Taylor (Blio), txtr, Axis360 (libraries), Overdrive (libraries), Flipkart, Oyster, Scribd, Gardners retail, Gardners Library, Yuzu, Tolino, Odilo
Conversion/membership fee: $0

This is the distributor I’ve used the most — for a number of reasons. First of all, for a no-charge aggregator, their distribution list is more than acceptable. Overdrive and Gardners Library (the largest library ebook distributors in North America and the UK) are particularly nice additions. Second, the service is great — when I’ve had a problem, they’ve been incredibly helpful. Third, they are also a retailer themselves — a small retailer, but hey, any outlet that buys you lunch once or twice a month is nice!

Downside? The user interface isn’t as slick as some others, and the ebook conversion engine (their famous Meatgrinder) isn’t my favorite. (A clue for next month — none of the online conversion tools win this category as far as I’m concerned. But I’m picky!)


[1] In other words, if you put the book on sale — unless through a KindleSelect promotion — or Amazon lowers the price (i.e., to match another retailer’s sales price), they pay you not based on the full price, but on the actual transaction price. That? That’s NOT AGENCY PRICING. That’s what the big publishers have been screaming about for years. Amazon lowers your book’s price; you get paid on the discounted price, not on the price you set.
[2] KindleSelect is the 90-day program that makes your title available through KindleUnlimited and the Kindle Owners Lender Library. To participate, the title must be available only through Amazon during the 90-day period.
[3] Whether or not you think that’s a good thing is up to you. It does improve discoverability, however.
[4] And will charge this fee every time you wish to revise your book.

Photo: BigStockPhoto

tbd advanced publishing starter kit

33 Comments

  1. Fernando Good

    Thanks for the ebook retailers! great help

    Reply
  2. Carolyn Jaynes

    Amazon undercuts its authors with its used book sales option. The author receives nothing when the book is resold. And there is no way to opt out. So I’m basically giving away my life’s work on their site. I would like to see a lot more competition for them to start treating authors with the respect for actually providing the creative products they sell!

    Reply
  3. Terry Odell

    I’ll add my recommendation for Draft2Digital. Their interface is easy to use. They’ve got phenomenal customer service (you talk to a LIVE person who speaks English), and they pay monthly. They’re expanding their distribution channels. I still like Smashwords for being able to offer discount coupons without playing price-matching/changing games, and I use D2D primarily for getting into Apple, since I don’t have a Mac. If you go direct to Kobo, you can participate in some of their special promotions, which is a big plus there.

    Reply
    • Ria Stone

      I am currently in the process of converting a Word.doc with Digital 2 Direct (D2D) and I am having unexpected problems.

      The primary one is their conversion process. They remove all extra space where I used hard returns to separate elements in the manuscript, so now it all runs together without distinction. Their only solution was to add two hard returns where I wanted one. Plus, they seem to have a limited range of typeface selections in font and size.

      I am a former typesetter, so I am surprised no eBook conversion software comes anywhere close to offering a range of typesetting functions. The use of spacing variations is a basic design element.

      Plus, on the D2D website I see no samples of their work or an address for their location. These two missing elements gives me pause.

      Anyway, thanks for the informative article.

      Reply
      • Anma Natsu

        You should never use hard returns for formatting eBooks, rather use styles and use paragraph spacing. This is noted in many guides on formatting eBooks and is done in part to better serve the fluid nature of eBook displays and the differences between devices. Amazon’s KDP conversion will often do the same thing if you used hard returns.

        It’s important to remember that an eBook is not the same as a print book, rather it is formatted using HTML and CSS, the same code used for formatting websites, and they are built and designed for digital display, not print. If you go into formatting an eBook with the idea of doing it the way you might do a print one, it tends to lead to frustration.

        Also, the limit on typeface is not specific to D2D, but eBook devices. Kindle devices, for example, only have a small set of fonts available, so no matter what you set it at, unless you hard code and embed it, it will flip to the reader’s preferences which is strongly preferred. (Readers regularly express annoyance at authors and publishers who override their settings). Joel has an excellent article on the fonts on Kindle: https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2015/06/kindle-new-bookerly-font-and-typography-features/

        That said, it would help D2D if they lost the “anything goes, we can work with it” idea and just crafted a basic style guide the same as Smashwords and Amazon do.

        For your last points, Ria, I’m not sure what kind of “sample” you’d want to see? They are a distributor, which isn’t the sort of work that is really sampled anymore than any other. If you mean on the formatting – that’s what you do. They have an online tool, sure, but it’s still your job, and they do have a previewer for that to let you check it before publishing.

        Also their address is right on their contact page… https://www.draft2digital.com/contact/

        Reply
      • David Kudler

        One thing to remember about ebooks: they’re based on HTML. By default, they get rid of whitespace — like empty paragraps. So hitting ENTER more than once in a Word doc won’t do anything in many conversion apps. Same with using the SPACEbar to add indents.

        There are a couple of ways around this.

        If you add a non-breaking space (shift-SPACE) before hitting the second ENTER, you’ll get a consistent double-space break. You can also use the Styles menu (in Word or InDesign or whatever) to create a style that has an extra top margin.

        The lack of control over typefaces, text flow, etc., is part of what makes most (if not all) of the online conversion tools fall short for me as well. But many folks are looking for ease of use, rather than fine-grain design tools.

        I believe D2D — like Smashwords — allows direct upload of fully formatted ePub files, which allows you to style to your heart’s content (within limitations — Smashwords in particular has stringent guidelines to make sure that the ebook will display properly when read no matter whether it’s on iBooks, on a Nook, or on Scribd in your browser.

        Draft2Digital is located in Oklahoma City — if you go to their Contact page, it lists their address and phone number.

        Reply
        • Ria Stone

          David, thanks for the tips.

          I must have missed the address when I looked for it.

          A sample page would be helpful. I think visuals are important.

          I use a combination of styles with spacing and hard returns but D2D stripped it all out. Because I want to use D2D to distribute a POD not an eBook, I have to upload a word doc, so style details are more important, in that case.

          The end result from D2D looked terrible even as an eBook. I have published three eBooks on Smashwords and they look fine (with a minimum of quirks).

          Bottom line, I will reformat my word doc and try it one more time.

          Thanks again for the great information and reply.

          Reply
          • David Kudler

            You should get in the habit of styling through the Styles palette in Word anyway rather than using the tab, space, and return keys — I wrote about that a couple of posts ago. It will save a lot of headache in preparing your book for multiple media.

            I’ve been meaning to try out D2D’s POD option — but since I upload directly to Createspace already, I haven’t really had the need.

            You might look at going that route. Createspace requires that you upload a print-ready PDF, but I’d have to imagine that you’d be happier with the results of creating your own (retaining control over the fonts, the spacing, etc.) than using an online converter to do it for you.

    • Ria Stone

      Terry, sounds like you work for D2D.

      Reply
  4. Conrad Zero

    Your listing for pronoun.com needs to be corrected, they do not charge a fee for conversion/distribution and they do not take a cut of sales. Retailers take their cut, and pronoun’s 3rd party payment system (paypal, required) gets a taste, but “100% of earnings” go to the authors.

    Retailer’s fees are outlined here: https://support.pronoun.com/knowledge_base/topics/what-are-the-retailers-distribution-fees

    This article mentions how pronoun has existing business/funding, and doesn’t need to charge authors: https://www.digitalbookworld.com/2015/vook-to-relaunch-as-free-self-publishing-platform-pronoun/

    And pronoun’s ebook conversion system is disturbingly easy, although I can’t speak to the quality.

    -Conrad

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      Thanks for the update!

      I tried to check but am not in the beta, and so couldn’t find firm info — I went with what I remember of Vook’s price structure, which I should have remembered didn’t apply.

      How are they making their money?

      Reply
      • David Kudler

        And the answer is… They weren’t. They’ve just announced that they’re closing. :-(

        I’m publishing an update of this list here on TBD.

        Reply
    • David Kudler

      Glad this was helpful! And sorry I didn’t post it before the previous article. :-)

      Reply
  5. Anma Natsu

    It should also probably be noted that Google Play is closed to new authors (with no word of when they will open back up).

    Another way I’ve heard of going to iBooks direct if you are a windows user is using a service like MacInCloud where you can either pay by the hour of use (which I think for most indies would be the cheaper option starting out) or per month to basically rent a Mac. I haven’t tried it myself yet, since I’m in Select, but it’s an appealing idea since going direct with iBooks gives you way more options and tools.

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      Thanks for that update, Anma! I had missed that piece of news.

      To be honest, I wouldn’t be surprised if Google got out of the ebook business. I don’t think they make a lot of money out of it. It would be a shame — one more worthy competitor to Amazon gone (though the Google Play ebook management system has always been… idiosyncratic, to say the least), and it’s been an easy way for indie and self-publishers to get their books on Google Books pre-publication.

      Reply
      • Anma Natsu

        They did seem to be moving towards that direction, though with them buying up Oyster, they may be planning to restructure and come back to compete both with eBook buying and KU, which would be kind of interesting :-D

        Reply
  6. Tina Back

    For an online ebook creation tool I recommend you to have a look at http://www.booqla.com.

    (I beta-tested the conversion tool, but that’s it. Not getting paid for this :) )

    For a one-time flat fee you get both (validated) epub and mobi files. Once you pay for the first download, you can change, fix and update the content as many times as you like.

    You can import a full Word document (keeping chapter headings and italics) and the tool creates separate ebook chapters included in the clickable (external) toc. You can create tables, insert pics, add quotes and change the text’s direction (for languages going from right to left) by using the tool’s dashboard. There’s an icon to add/remove indents.

    As a user you never see the code, so you can’t mess up the code :)

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      Thanks for the new tool, Tina (not one I’d heard of). And thanks for the clear disclaimer. :-)

      I’ll include Boogla when I review online conversion tools next time (along with a couple of others). The focus here was more on retail sites and distributors (most of which have their own tools), so I’ll still be able to get it in!

      I, of course, like to be able to see the code, but I do recognize that that’s an illness on my part.

      One question: is there a “publisher rate” — pay more than the single-conversion fee and get ten conversions or whatever — or do you always pay the same fee per conversion?

      Reply
      • David Kudler

        And that would be Booqla, not Boogla. :-p

        Reply
      • Mikael Norrman

        Hi, I’m Mikael, founder of Booqla.

        I will use the possibility of answering your question David.

        Currently the service is free to use. There will later on be two ways of payment. First is “pay per book” (ebook and typeset PDF) and second is a subscription based where user pay a monthly fee depending on amount conversions needed.

        I am at your service if anyone has any questions or suggestions

        Reply
        • David Kudler

          Thank you, Mikael!

          Another question: will you be distributing the ebooks to retailers, and if so, to whom? Likewise, how will you be distributing the POD books? How regional will the distribution network be?

          Reply
          • Mikael Norrman

            In Sweden where we have our main business so far (except Russia) the market for selling ebooks is very limited and controlled by the big publishers and their partners. This makes it nearly impossible to have a direct connection to the resellers. Amazon/Itunes have not yet had any impact on our country so providing a channel to them would not make any difference.

            We havent tried very hard breaking the Swedish monopoly, instead we have focused on developing our service which is without a doubt the biggest web based service in the Nordic countries.

            So, the answer is none. We dont have any direct connection with any distributors. Instead our users are free to download the files and use the providers they choose. We believe that freedom to choose is the way to go.

            Today we are provding print in volume, not print on demand. We distribute to clients in any EU country with flat rate delivery. The prices we offer makes us one of the cheaper in Europe and quality is i would say, high.

            In the US which we still are only probing we are currently having discussions with some print companies, nothing concrete yet but we have high hopes. We are taking baby steps to ensure the best possible result and are still open for proposals.

            Our goal is to find a partner in the US which has the contacts and a working publishing service where we provide the technical solution (Booqla). Since our system can be integrated seamlessly on any existing platform we can strengthen a service with another dimension without users knowing where the original service ends and Booqla begins.

            The publisher will not be limited only by their traditional services being publishers but they can also bring in self publishers which they can offer additional paid services to.

  7. Jason Matthews

    Nice collection here, Joel. Must be early because it took me a while to realize the list was alphabetical. For the retailers, it’s a smart order of options for self-publishing. For the distributors, I was wondering why the heck Aerio was on top and Smashwords on bottom.

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      Heh. Sorry about that, Jason. I struggled to come up with an organization that didn’t seem even more arbitrary — and Amazon came out at the top in the “Big 5” no matter how I shuffled them. ;-)

      Yes: in terms of my recommendations to clients, I always suggest Smashwords first — it’s the distributor that (in my mind) best combines cost-effectiveness and wide distribution. Also, I’m a fan of Mark Coker.

      But I recognize that everyone’s needs differ, and the other distributors have their advantages. I probably should have annotated the lists to make it clear how I’d organized them.

      (BTW, I left Pronoun.com — Vook-that-was — off the list because they’re still in beta for their new conversion/distribution site, even though that was one of the first online conversion tools I tried out back in the day.)

      Reply
  8. Michael N. Marcus

    If Amazon availability is sufficient for a particular book, I use KDP.

    I use eBookit.com for ebook formatting and broad distribution. The company has knowledgeable and responsive human beings who speak American English, they do great work, they do it fast at a reasonable price, and my money comes in every month. I could not be happier and I am pleased to recommend the company.

    https://www.ebookit.com/index.php?promo=&refid=10937712

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      Thanks, Michael, both for the comment and the link. EbookIt is new to me — I’ll have to check it out.

      For nearly all clients (and anyone else who’ll listen), I recommend at the very least posting directly to KDP (if not all five of the “Big 5”) and using a distributor to get their book out to everywhere else. Amazon is the eight-hundred-pound gorilla in this room, for sure, but you’re shutting out somewhere between fifteen and forty percent of your possible market if you stop with KDP.

      Also, while Amazon has been good to me as both an author and a small publisher, I really want to support competition, because I have to believe that should (say) B&N and Google drop out of the ebook retail business, Amazon would hardly have an incentive to treat me better once they’ve reached a virtual monopoly. Look at how they’ve wrestled with the big-time publishers.

      Reply
    • David Kudler

      Hey, Michael — a question. What does EbookIt’s promotion consist of? What’s your experience been?

      Reply
  9. Ernie Zelinski

    Shouldn’t this line for Amazon read:

    “70% of sales price[1] if between $2.99 and $9.99”

    instead of:

    “70% of sales price[1] if between $2.99 and $7.99” ?

    Reply
    • David Kudler

      D’oh! Of course it should. Not sure how that slipped through — my apologies. And thank you for pointing that out.

      Yes, Amazon’s 70% royalty (minus $0.15/MB transport fee) is for ebooks priced between $2.99 and $9.99.

      I’ve said this before, but just to repeat: unless yours is a very image-heavy ebook that makes the transport-fee-less 35% royalty more attractive, it never makes sense for a KDP publisher to price an ebook between $10.00 and $19.99 — you’re literally losing money on each transaction as well as pricing yourself out of sales — over $9.99 is generally a premium price for ebooks.

      Reply
    • Joel Friedlander

      I’ve corrected this in the article.

      Reply

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