This Week in the Blogs, May 26 – June 1, 2013

by Joel Friedlander on June 2, 2013 · 1 comment

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The days are getting longer, the nights warmer, the outdoors more appealing. Yep, spring is turning to summer, but there’s no letdown, even when most of the publishing pros have flown off to New York for some big book party. Never fear, bloggers are still hard at it, and this week turns up help with your fan base, finding an editor, the fate of hybrid authors, launch parties, and a few Kindle tips. Have fun.

Lindsay Buroker on Lindsay Buroker
New Author Series: How Do You Build a Fan Base, Anyway?
“So many authors only focus on selling the book they’re releasing right now. They may want a fan base, but they don’t take the actions they need to in order to turn that fan base into a reality.”

Stacy Ennis on Jane Friedman
5 Ways to Find the Right Freelance Book Editor
“First things first: If you’re going to hand over your manuscript to an editor, give it to a skilled, qualified editor. Just because someone teaches English or has a degree in English (or even writing), that alone doesn’t qualify that person as a professional editor.”

Nate Hoffelder on The Digital Reader
Piercing the Hype: The Hybrid Author is the New Pottermore
” I have come to the conclusion that for 2013 the hybrid author is the much-hyped topic of discussion that is not worth paying attention to.”

Stephanie Chandler on Authority Publishing
How to Host a Buzz-Worthy Book Launch Party
“I often advise authors to approach a local independent bookstore. Many of these locations are thrilled to feature local authors and their new books. They will allow you to bring your books in on consignment, and will expect the standard 40% discount off of the retail price, but they will also help promote you to their customers before, and even after, the event is over.”

Ed Ditto on Good Words
Four Kindle formatting problems you can’t fix…so you might as well stop trying.
“Something every DIY author should know is that there are aesthetic shortcomings built directly into the Kindle ebook standard. These intrinsic “problems” can’t be fixed, no matter how many different techniques you try. So you might as well cut your losses and move on.”

Photo: bigstockphoto.com

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    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    Dana Shepard June 2, 2013 at 4:21 am

    When the author gives the go ahead, and hopefully is proud of his cover, it is all worth it; then you realize that you, the book cover designer, were part of a pretty special process.

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